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FRONT VIEW OF LIMESTONE SCULPTURE

Sculpture front viewTHE TREE. In the 18th century George Rodney, an admiral in the Royal Navy, increased the prosperity of the area by using the wood of the extensive oak forests to build and repair his ships. A grateful population raised a stone monument in his honour on the summit of the Breidden Hill a few miles from Llanymynech.THE BORDER. The division down the centre of the tree and across the village name denotes the border between Wales and England.    THE KILN. Below the barge, to the left, and carved into a pattern of bricks, is the complete Hoffman Ring Kiln, used for the continuous burning of limestone. THE SHELLS. The shells represent some of the creatures whose remains combined with silt and mud in the warm, inland sea which once covered this region over 340 million years ago, to eventually form the rock we know as limestone.BRAKE mechanism for the gin wheel involved these large straps around the large drum which were controlled by the metal rod linkages. 'HINGES' for the book are part of the brake strap for the gin wheel drum.THE IRONWORK is made up of relics contributed by residents. The chains would have been used to haul wagons up the tramways and been wound around the gin wheel drum. There are also various tools and a small section of rail.THE IRONWORK is made up of relics contributed by residents. The chains would have been used to haul wagons up the tramways and been wound around the gin wheel drum. There are also various tools and a small section of rail.THE BARGE. A canal barge illustrates the importance of the canal in moving  limestone and burnt lime to customers throughout the area, and bringing in coal and supplies. Farmers would spread lime on their fields, as much of the soil on the Severn-Vyrnwy flood plain was very acidic. The lime was also used to make lime mortar and as a flux in the manufacture of iron.WILDLIFE there are several examples of flora and fauna shown on the sculpture.THE ROMAN SOLDIER. Llanymynech has a long, history of mining for various minerals and the quarrying of limestone from Llanymynech Hill. On the north - west side of the Hill are the remains of ancient surface mines, where the Romans excavated for lead, copper and possibly silver. According to William Cathrall, who compiled a book, The History of Oswestry, in 1855, 'there is no doubt that the Roman miners smelted their copper there in jars in open hearths'. Beneath the carving of a Roman soldier's head is the name : MEDIOLANUM. In Catherall's book the late Rev. Peter Roberts stated that the reputed Roman encampment in the area was: 'the identical spot where Mediolanum once quartered the legions of ambitious Rome.' THE KILN. Below the barge, to the left, and carved into a pattern of bricks, is the complete Hoffman Ring Kiln, used for the continuous burning of limestone.

On screen information is from Llanymynech Heritage pamphlet / folder.

DETAIL OF THE ‘BOOK’

Sculp book detailTHE ROMAN SOLDIER. Llanymynech has a long, history of mining for various minerals and the quarrying of limestone from Llanymynech Hill. On the north - west side of the Hill are the remains of ancient surface mines, where the Romans excavated for lead, copper and possibly silver. According to William Cathrall, who compiled a book, The History of Oswestry, in 1855, 'there is no doubt that the Roman miners smelted their copper there in jars in open hearths'. Beneath the carving of a Roman soldier's head is the name : MEDIOLANUM. In Catherall's book the late Rev. Peter Roberts stated that the reputed Roman encampment in the area was: 'the identical spot where Mediolanum once quartered the legions of ambitious Rome.' THE CHURCH. To the left of the tree St. Agatha's church in Llanymynech is depicted, and left again the chimney of the Hoffman Ring Kiln.THE BORDER. The division down the centre of the tree and across the village name denotes the border between Wales and England.    'HINGES' for the book are part of the brake strap for the gin wheel drum.WILDLIFE there are several examples of flora and fauna shown on the sculpture.THE TREE. In the 18th century George Rodney, an admiral in the Royal Navy, increased the prosperity of the area by using the wood of the extensive oak forests to build and repair his ships. A grateful population raised a stone monument in his honour on the summit of the Breidden Hill a few miles from Llanymynech.'HINGES' for the book are part of the brake strap for the gin wheel drum.

MAIN ROAD SIDE OF LIMESTONE SCULPTURE
Showing detail of a brake strap for the drum of gin wheel and the first part of metal rod linkage system. This linkage would have been activated by the brakeman pulling a lever. SEE DIAGRAMS AT BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE

Sculp gin brake

SEAT ON LIMESTONE SCULPTURE

Sculp seat

THE OWL
The small carving of an owl, wearing a mortar-board, was done by the children of nearby Carreghofa school, this being the school’s emblem.

Sculp owl side
Carreghofa Owl
gin brake
gin drum
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